ALLAH does not change the state of people, until they change it themselves

19.11.11

Nationalism In Islam By Dr. Muhammad Iqbal

"...Nationalism in the sense of love of one's country and even readiness to die for its honour, is a part of the Muslim's faith; it comes into conflict with Islam only when it begins to play the role of a political concept and claims to be a principle of human solidarity demanding that Islam should recede to the background of a mere private opinion and cease to be a living factor in the national life. In Turkey, Persia, Egypt and other Muslim countries it will never become a problem. In these countries Muslims constitute an overwhelming majority and their minorities, i.e., Jews, Christians and Zoroastrians, according to the law of Islam, are either "People of the Book" or "like the People of the Book" with whom the law of Islam allows free social relations, including matrimonial alliances. It becomes a problem for Muslims only in countries where they happen to be in a minority, and nationalism demands their complete self-effacement. In majority countries Islam accommodates nationalism; for there Islam and nationalism are practically identical; in minority countries it is justified in seeking self-determination as a cultural unit. In either case, it is thoroughly consistent with itself..."

for further reading: Islam and Ahmedism by Muhammad Iqbal

1 comment:

  1. This is a very important point to remember that in any country where Muslims are in majority, "Islam and nationalism are practically identical."

    This aspect of Iqbal's message has been overlooked since 1953, and Muslim nations have paid a great price for overlooking it.

    Very interestingly, the very name of Pakistan illustrates this point.

    Those who struggled for Pakistan defined the meaning of this word as "There is no god except God" (La ilaha illa Allah). Once I accept that this is the meaning of Pakistan, I can say, "I am a Pakistani" and it would not conflict with my being a Muslim, because I would just be saying, "I am someone who believes in the Unity of God".

    At the same time a Hindu, Christian, Parsi or any other non-Muslim citizen of Pakistan can also say, "I am a Pakistani" and it would not conflict with their religion either.

    Our poet Jamiluddin Aali has very beautifully said:

    لوگو اپنے نام کو سمجھو اِس میں عجب افسانہ ہے
    معانی و مطلب پوچھ رہے ہیں کب اِن میں ڈھل جانا ہے
    پاکستان کو جان اور دل سے پاکستان بنانا ہے

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